IoT Security Integration Status with Firewalls

Check the integration of IoT Security with next-generation firewalls on the Firewalls page in the IoT Security portal.
The Firewalls page (
Administration
Sites and Firewalls
Firewalls
) provides an overview of firewall connectivity and activity, the status of logs that firewalls send and the requests they make for policy rule recommendations and IP address-to-device mappings, and individual firewall details.
The overview at the top of the page shows how many sites are under IoT Security management, how many firewalls are subscribed to IoT Security, how many firewalls are active and inactive, and how many system alerts there are. Click the system alerts number to view the list of alerts at
Alerts
System Alerts
.
IoT Security considers a firewall to be active if it received a log from it within the past 30 minutes, and if it doesn’t receive a log during this time, it automatically generates an alert. The Firewalls page also shows how many log events firewalls sent to IoT Security over the past 7 days, 24 hours, or hour (depending on the time filter you set), the time the last log was received, and the connectivity status of the firewalls.
IoT Security coordinates data received from all the firewalls at the same site. Not every firewall needs to send logs to IoT Security as long as other firewalls do and their logs capture network traffic data from all the IoT devices that you want IoT Security to monitor.
Hover your cursor over the
Firewall Request Status
icon to see if IoT Security is receiving requests from firewalls for policy recommendations and IP address-to-device mappings.
When IoT Security has received requests for one of these within the past 30 minutes, the status is
Active
. Otherwise it is
Inactive
.
Firewalls send log events to the logging service, which streams them to IoT Security for analysis and, depending on your IoT Security subscription type, sends them to Cortex Data Lake for storage. IoT Security then processes and analyzes the raw metadata. It stores the device network traffic data generated from its analysis for a month but does not retain the raw data. The Firewall Log Type Status section shows whether or not IoT Security has received log events from the logging service for EAL, DHCP, DHCP ACK, ARP, traffic, and threat logs within the past 30 minutes. If it has, the status is
Live Data
. If it hasn’t, the status is
No Live Data
.
When the status is
Live Data
, it does not mean that all active firewalls have sent log events to the logging service within the past 30 minutes. Although that is possible, you can only safely deduce that at least one active firewall has done so and that the logging service has then streamed whatever log events it received to IoT Security. However, if the status is
No Live Data
, you can safely conclude that within the past 30 minutes the logging service has received no log events from any firewalls.
The status of firewalls in the overview section as
Active
or
Inactive
is not real-time data. It’s updated every 30 minutes on the hour and half hour. On the other hand, the firewall log type status is close to real time. Every time you refresh the page, the Firewall Log Type Status shows the current status of these four log types. As a result, a temporary mismatch can sometimes occur between the two status indicators.
Hover your cursor over the graph icon in the Log Events column to see a panel pop-up with information about each type of log.
The panel contains a graph that shows the total number of log events that IoT Security received. When you set the time filter at the top of the page to
1 Week
, the data is displayed in seven 24-hour intervals covering the last 7 days. When you set the filter to
1 Day
, the data is displayed in six 4-hour intervals covering the last 24 hours. And when you set it to
1 Hour
, the data is displayed in six 10-minute intervals for the last 60 minutes. Hover your cursor over various data points to see a tooltip with more information about it.
Hover your cursor over the graph icon in the Average Latency column to see a panel popup with information about the latency between the time that a firewall uploads logs to the logging service and the time that IoT Security receives them.
When you set the time filter at the top of the page to
1 Week
, the average latency is displayed for each of the last 7 days. When you set the filter for
1 Day
, the average latency is displayed in six 4-hour intervals covering the last 24 hours. When you set it to
1 Hour
, the average latency is displayed in six 10-minute intervals for the last 60 minutes. Hover your cursor over various data points to see a tooltip with more information about it.
The remainder of the Firewalls page contains a table with all the firewalls subscribed to IoT Security services. You can use the column control tool (icon with three gray bars that appears above the table) to customize the data that appears in the table. In addition to the status, hostname, serial number, IP address (not visible by default) of a firewall and the version of PAN-OS running on it, the table displays several other data points. There are columns for the IoT dictionary version, application content version for App-ID, and firewall license type—Prod (Production), Eval (Evaluation), or Lab. You can also see the number of different types of log events from each firewall, the site where it’s located (not visible by default), when it first connected with IoT Security, and when it was last active.
By default, the IoT Dictionary Version column is visible in the table. If it does not appear in the table, click the column visibility icon (three vertical bars) and select
IoT Dictionary Ver
. This column shows the version-build number of the dictionary file on each firewall. A new version is released every two weeks, with the build number incrementally increasing across versions. For example, version was 1-218 released, and then two weeks later (and two internal builds later) version 2-221 was released.
All firewalls should have the same IoT dictionary version; that is, the latest version. If a firewall is using an outdated dictionary—most likely because it cannot reach the update server—it cannot use Device-ID to enforce Security policy rules with complete accuracy. Take steps to restore its connectivity to the update server so the next time the firewall automatically checks its IoT dictionary version against the one on the server, which it does every two hours, it will detect a new version and download it.
Only firewalls running PAN-OS version 10.0 or later support Device-ID and IoT dictionaries. For firewalls running earlier versions of PAN-OS, a dash appears in this column.
The application content version determines the type of protocol data in the logs a firewall sends to IoT Security. A low version might not generate the IoT protocol logs that IoT Security needs.
The far-right column provides options to move a firewall from one site to another.
If you click a firewall serial number, a pop-panel appears with information about the logs from this firewall. You can see if IoT Security is currently receiving live data, timestamps of the latest logs, the number of events received, the average latency, and the maximum latency within the time filter specified for the Firewalls page (
1 Week
,
1 Day
, or
1 Hour
).

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