Methods to Check for Corporate Credential Submissions

Before you Set Up Credential Phishing Prevention, decide which method you want the firewall to use to check if credentials submitted to a web page are valid, corporate credentials.
Method to Check Submitted Credentials
User-ID Configuration Requirements
How does this method detect corporate usernames and/or passwords as users submit them to websites?
Group Mapping
Group Mapping configuration on the firewall
The firewall determines if the username a user submits to a restricted site matches any valid corporate username.
To do this, the firewall matches the submitted username to the list of usernames in its user-to-group mapping table to detect when users submit a corporate usernames to a site in a restricted category.
This method only checks for corporate username submissions based on LDAP group membership, which makes it simple to configure, but more prone to false positives.
IP User Mapping
IP-address-to- username mappings identified through User Mapping, GlobalProtect, or Authentication Policy and Captive Portal.
The firewall determines if the username a user submits to a restricted site maps to the IP address of the logged-in user.
To do this, the firewall matches the IP address of the logged in user and the username submitted to a web site to its IP-address-to-user mapping table to detect when users submit their corporate usernames to a site in a restricted category.
Because this method matches the IP address of the logged-in user associated with the session against the IP-address-to-username mapping table, it is an effective method for detecting corporate username submissions, but it does not detect corporate password submission. If you want to detect corporate username and password submission, you must use the Domain Credential Filter method.
Domain Credential Filter
Windows-based User-ID agent configured with the User-ID credential service add-on
- AND -
IP-address-to- username mappings identified through User Mapping, GlobalProtect, or Authentication Policy and Captive Portal.
The firewall determines if the username and password a user submits matches the same user’s corporate username and password.
To do this, the firewall must able to match credential submissions to valid corporate usernames and passwords and verify that the username submitted maps to the IP address of the logged in user as follows:
  • To detect corporate usernames and passwords
    —The firewall retrieves a secure bit mask, called a
    bloom filter
    , from a Windows-based User-ID agent equipped with the User-ID credential service add-on. This add-on service scans your directory for usernames and password hashes and deconstructs them into a secure bit mask—the bloom filter—and delivers it to the Windows agent. The firewall retrieves the bloom filter from the Windows agent at regular intervals and, whenever it detects a user submitting credentials to a restricted category, it reconstructs the bloom filter and looks for a matching username and password hash. The firewall can only connect to one Windows-based User-ID agent running the User-ID credential service add-on.
  • To verify that the credentials belong to the logged-in user
    —The firewall looks for a mapping between the IP address of the logged-in user and the detected username in its IP-address-to-username mapping table.
To learn more how the domain credential method works, and the requirements for enabling this type of detection, see Configure Credential Detection with the Windows-based User-ID Agent.

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