Set up IoT Security and XSOAR for Cisco ISE Integration

Set up IoT Security and Cortex XSOAR to integrate with Cisco ISE.
To set up IoT Security to integrate through Cortex XSOAR with Cisco ISE, you must add a Cortex XSOAR engine to your network.
You must also configure the Cisco ISE integration instance in XSOAR. To do this, you need the IP address of your Cisco ISE system and the username and password of the ERS admin user account that the XSOAR engine will use when forming a secure connection with ISE.

Cortex XSOAR Engine Installation

The Cortex XSOAR engine initiates connections to Cisco ISE and to the Cortex cloud and provides the means through which they communicate with each other. Although it's possible to install an XSOAR engine on machines running Windows, macOS, and Linux operating systems, only an engine on a Linux machine supports IoT Security integrations. For more information about operating system and hardware requirements, see the Cortex Administrator’s Guide.
We recommend downloading the XSOAR engine using the shell installer script and installing it on a Linux machine. This simplifies the deployment by automatically installing all required dependencies and also enables remote engine upgrades.
When placing the XSOAR engine on your network, make sure it can form HTTPS connections to your Cisco ISE system on TCP ports 443 and 9060. The XSOAR engine uses TCP 443 when authenticating with Cisco ISE and sending it quarantine commands. The XSOAR engine uses TCP 9060 (referred to as the “server port” in XSOAR) to send Cisco ISE data in custom IoT Security-specific attributes.
The firewall must also allow the engine to form HTTPS connections on TCP port 443 to the Cortex cloud at https://<your-domain>.iot.demisto.live/. You can see the URL of your XSOAR instance when you log in to the IoT Security portal and click
Integrations
Launch Cortex XSOAR
. It’s visible in the address bar of the web page displaying the XSOAR interface.
To create an XSOAR engine, access the Cortex XSOAR interface (from the IoT Security portal, click
Integrations
Launch Cortex XSOAR
). Click
Settings
Engines
+ Create New Engine
. Choose
Shell
as the type.
For installation instructions, see Install Cortex XSOAR Engines.
For help troubleshooting Cortex XSOAR engines, including installations, upgrades, connectivity, and permissions, see Troubleshoot Cortex XSOAR Engines and Troubleshoot Integrations Running on Engines.

Configure IoT Security and Cortex XSOAR

  1. Log in to IoT Security and from there access Cisco ISE settings in Cortex XSOAR.
    1. Log in to IoT Security and then click
      Integrations
      .
      IoT Security uses Cortex XSOAR to integrate with Cisco ISE, and the settings you must configure to integrate with ISE are in the XSOAR interface.
    2. To access these settings, click
      Launch Cortex XSOAR
      .
      The Cortex XSOAR interface opens in a new browser window.
    3. Click
      Settings
      in the left navigation menu, search for
      cisco ise
      in the Settings section to locate it among other instances.
  2. Configure the primary active instance.
    1. Click the active integration instance settings icon ( ) to open the settings panel.
    2. Enter the following and leave other settings at their default values:
      Cisco ISE server URL
      : Enter the Cisco ISE server URL (beginning with “https://”).
      Server port
      : Enter the server port on which the Cisco ISE server listens for connection requests.
      Cisco ISE username
      : Enter the ERS admin username you previously created.
      Password
      : Enter the password associated with the username.
      Run on Single engine
      : Choose the XSOAR engine that you want to communicate with the Cisco ISE system.
    3. When finished, click
      Run test
      or
      Test
      .
      If the test is successful, a Success message appears. If not, check that the settings were entered correctly and then test the configuration again.
    4. After the test succeeds, click
      Save & exit
      to save your changes.
  3. (
    Optional
    ) Create more integration instances to which IoT Security and XSOAR will export device attributes.
    To create another integration instance, repeat the previous steps, entering a unique name for the new instance and different settings as appropriate for each of your other ISE servers.
    Each instance can be for an ISE server that’s a member in an active/standby high availability (HA) pair or that’s functioning as a standalone device.
  4. Add a job to update ISE with custom endpoint attributes incrementally.
    1. Copy the name of the primary active integration instance and open a duplicate browser window.
    2. Navigate to
      Jobs
      in the new window, and then click
      New Job
      at the top of the page.
    3. In the New Job panel that appears, enter the following and leave the other settings at their default values:
      Recurring
      : Select this because you want to periodically export endpoint attributes to ISE.
      Every
      : Enter a number and set the interval value (Minutes, Hours, Days, or Weeks) and select the days on which to run the job. (If you don’t select anything, the job runs everyday.) This determines how often XSOAR sends data to ISE. It’s important to set an interval that allows enough time for the job to complete, considering factors such as the number of devices involved, the amount of bandwidth and latency in the connection, and the processing speed of the ISE server. You might start by running the job every 15 minutes and then increasing it as necessary until each job completes before the next one starts. You can see the run status of a recurring job on the Jobs page. When in progress, its status is
      Running
      . When done, its status changes to
      Completed
      .
      Name
      : Enter a name for the job.
      Playbook
      : Choose
      Incremental Export to Cisco ISE - PANW IoT 3rd Party Integration
      .
      PANW IoT Device Custom Attributes
      : By default, IoT Security exports all device attributes through XSOAR to ISE. If you want to export a subset, clear the Export Attribute check box for the ones you don’t want to export.
      If you defined your own custom endpoint attribute names in ISE, replace the default names with those.
      PANW IoT In Scope Tag Enforcement
      : Select
      Yes
      to filter attributes that IoT Security exports to only devices with the
      Cisco ISE
      tag type and the
      In Scope
      tag value. If you don’t want to filter exported attributes by tagged devices, leave this as
      No
      . For information about tagging devices in IoT Security, see Tag Management.
      Playbook Poll Interval
      : Enter a number (the value, though unspecified, is minutes) defining the period of time during which IoT Security must see newly discovered devices or changes in any attribute fields of previously discovered devices to include their attributes in the list it provides to XSOAR for export. It’s common to use the same interval as the one for running the recurring job. However, if you increase the interval between jobs, you can set a shorter interval for polling than that for the job. If you leave it blank, the default poll interval is 15 minutes.
      Primary Instance Name(s)
      : Paste the name you copied earlier. When integrating with two primary ISE servers in an HA pair, return to the duplicate browser window, copy the name of the primary standby instance, enter a comma after the primary active instance name, and paste the name of the primary standby instance.
      For a deployment with a single Cisco ISE instance, you can enter the name you copied in either this field or the Integration Instance Name field. If there happen to be names in both fields, the one in the Primary Instance Name field takes precedence.
      Secondary Instance Name(s)
      : If you configured a secondary integration instance, copy and paste the secondary active instance name. If there are two secondary ISE servers in an HA pair, enter a comma and copy and paste the secondary standby instance name.
      Although there’s an automatic failover between the active and standby nodes in an ISE HA pair, there isn’t an automatic failover between primary and secondary instances. The secondary instance provides data redundancy and can only manually be promoted to primary. IoT Security/Cortex XSOAR exports device attributes to the currently active primary instance and exports duplicate data to the currently active secondary instance.
      Site Names
      : Leave the field empty to export device attributes for all sites. To limit exports to devices at one or more sites, enter comma-separated site names.
    4. Create new job
      .
  5. Add a job to export custom endpoint attributes in bulk to ISE.
    1. Click
      New Job
      at the top of the Jobs page.
    2. In the New Job panel that appears, enter the following and leave the other settings at their default values:
      Name
      : Enter a name for the job. Example:
      ISE - Bulk Export
      Playbook
      : Choose
      Bulk Export to Cisco ISE - PANW IoT 3rd Party Integration
      .
      PANW IoT Device Custom Attributes
      : By default, IoT Security exports all device attributes through XSOAR to ISE. If you want to export a subset, clear the Export Attribute check box for the ones you don’t want to export.
      If you defined your own custom endpoint attribute names in ISE, replace the default names with those in ISE.
      PANW IoT In Scope Tag Enforcement
      : Select
      Yes
      to filter attributes that IoT Security exports to only devices with the
      Cisco ISE
      tag type and the
      In Scope
      tag value. If you don’t want to filter exported attributes by tagged devices, leave this as
      No
      . For information about tagging devices in IoT Security, see Tag Management.
      Primary Instance Name(s)
      : Paste the name you copied earlier. When integrating with two primary ISE servers in an HA pair, return to the duplicate browser window, copy the name of the primary standby instance, enter a comma after the primary active instance name, and paste the name of the primary standby instance.
      Secondary Instance Name(s)
      : If you configured a secondary integration instance, copy and paste the secondary active instance name. If there are two secondary ISE servers in an HA pair, enter a comma and copy and paste the secondary standby instance name.
      Although there’s an automatic failover between the active and standby nodes in an ISE HA pair, there isn’t an automatic failover between primary and secondary instances. The secondary instance provides data redundancy and can only manually be promoted to primary. IoT Security/Cortex XSOAR exports device attributes to the currently active primary instance and exports duplicate data to the currently active secondary instance.
      Site Names
      : Leave the field empty to export device attributes for all sites. To limit exports to devices at one or more sites, enter comma-separated site names.
    3. Create new job
      .
  6. Continue creating more jobs for other ISE integration instances as needed.
  7. To enable ISE integration instances, return to the Settings page and click
    Enable
    for all the instances you created.
  8. Return to the IoT Security portal and check the status of the Cisco ISE integration.
    When you see that its status has changed from
    Disabled
    to
    Active
    , the IoT Security/Cortex XSOAR setup is complete.
    XSOAR begins an automated process that sends Cisco ISE incrementally updated data from IoT Security about changes to device attributes occurring within the specified poll interval.
  9. Export the IoT device inventory from IoT Security to Cisco ISE.
    Although regular, automated incremental updates are now in progress, ISE doesn’t yet have a complete device inventory from IoT Security. This requires a bulk data export from IoT Security to ISE that you initiate from the XSOAR interface at a time that’s suitable for network operations. To shorten the time required for the bulk export to complete, plan to run it during off-peak hours on a slow day such as a holiday or weekend. Exporting an inventory of 30,000-40,000 IoT devices takes up to 12 hours when a network is under normal usage. Doing this when network traffic is light can shorten the time needed to complete the job.
    To start the bulk export of the entire device inventory, click
    Launch Cortex Access
    to return to the XSOAR interface. Click
    Jobs
    , select the job you created for bulk exports to ISE, and then click
    Run now
    .
    During the bulk export and after the job completes, the automated incremental update will continue running at the specified job interval.
    Although it’s possible to run multiple bulk export jobs in parallel, doing so can affect the XSOAR engine performance. Therefore, we advise not running more than one at a time.

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