Create Filters for the Advanced Routing Engine

Create filters for an Advanced Routing Engine to filter and redistribute routes.
The Advanced Routing Engine supports the filters described in this topic. Access lists, prefix lists, and redistribution route maps can apply to BGP, OSPFv2, OSPFv3 and RIPv2. Access lists and prefix lists can also apply to IPv4 multicast. Multicast route maps apply to IPv4 multicast. AS path access lists, community lists, and BGP route maps apply to BGP only.
Create a filter and reference the filter in a profile or other appropriate location to easily and consistently apply settings that control such things as route acceptance from peers into the local RIB, route advertisements to peers, conditional advertisements, setting attributes, exporting and importing routes to and from other routers, route aggregation, and route redistribution.
  • Access Lists
    —Use an access list:
    • To filter network routes based on IPv4/IPv6 source addresses and IPv4 destination addresses. For IPv4 access lists, source and destination addresses can be specified by an address and wildcard mask to express a range of addresses. IPv6 access lists can specify source addresses and subnet.
    • In a BGP Filtering profile, specify an Inbound Distribute List (access list) to control which routes BGP will accept from a peer group or peer (neighbor). This means that routes matching a deny access list rule are not placed in the local BGP RIB; routes matching a permit access list rule are placed in the local BGP RIB. You apply the BGP Filtering profile to a BGP peer group or peer in the Filtering IPv4 Unicast or Filtering IPv6 Unicast field. (To do this for a peer, select
      Inherit No
      ). Peer settings take precedence over peer group settings.
    • In a BGP Filtering profile, specify an Outbound Distribute List (access list) to control which routes the firewall advertises to its peer group or peer, based on your network and BGP deployment. Then apply the BGP Filtering profile to a BGP peer group or peer in the Filtering IPv4 Unicast or Filtering IPv6 Unicast field. (To do this for a peer, select
      Inherit No
      ). Peer settings take precedence over peer group settings.
    • As match criteria in a Redistribution route map to specify IPv4 or IPv6 destination Addresses, Next Hop, or Route Source.
    • In a BGP route map as match criteria for an IPv4 Address, Next Hop, or Route Source, and also for an IPv6 Address.
    • In OSPFv2 and OSPFv3 Import Lists and Export Lists for an Area Border Router (ABR).
    • To specify PIM group permissions for IPv4 multicast.
    An access list is not for filtering user traffic or for providing security.
    An access list can have multiple rules; routes are evaluated against the rules in sequential order. When a route matches a rule, the deny or permit action occurs and the route is not evaluated against subsequent rules.
    The aggregated view displays all configured access lists; you can highlight an access list to then modify or delete it.
  • Prefix Lists
    —Use a prefix list:
    • To filter network routes that are added to a local RIB based on route prefix and prefix length.
    • In a BGP Filtering Profile, specify an Inbound Prefix List to control which routes BGP will accept from a peer group or peer (neighbor). This means that routes matching a deny prefix list rule are not placed in the local BGP RIB; routes matching a permit prefix list rule are placed in the local BGP RIB. Then apply the BGP Filtering profile to a BGP peer group in the Filtering IPv4 Unicast or Filtering IPv6 Unicast field. (To do this for a peer, select Inherit No). Peer settings take precedence over peer group settings.
    • In a BGP Filtering profile, specify an Outbound Prefix List to control which routes the firewall advertises to its peer group or peer, based on your network and BGP deployment. Then apply the BGP Filtering profile to a BGP peer group or peer in the Filtering IPv4 Unicast or Filtering IPv6 Unicast field. (To do this for a peer, select Inherit No). Peer settings take precedence over peer group settings.
    • As match criteria in a Redistribution route map to specify IPv4 or IPv6 destination Addresses, Next Hop, or Route Source.
    • In a BGP route map as match criteria for an IPv4 Address, Next Hop, or Route Source, and also for an IPv6 Address.
    • For an OSPFv2 or OSPFv3 ABR of an area, in an Inbound Filter List or Outbound Filter List.
    • In an IPv4 Multicast PIM general configuration to specify an SPT threshold.
    • In an IPv4 Multicast route map.
    A prefix list can have multiple rules; routes are evaluated against the rules in sequential order. When a route matches a rule, the deny or permit action occurs and the route is not evaluated against subsequent rules. A prefix list is flexible in that it allows you to configure a prefix with a prefix length (that together identify the prefix), and also have a range by specifying that the prefix length be greater than, less than, or equal to a value. The firewall evaluates prefix lists more efficiently than access lists.
  • Redistribution Route Maps
    —Use a Redistribution Route Map in a Redistribution Profile to specify which BGP, OSPFv2, OSPFv3, RIP, connected or static routes (the source protocol) to redistribute to BGP, OSPFv2, OSPFv3, RIP, or the local RIB (the destination protocol). You can also redistribute BGP host routes to BGP peers. The match criteria can include IPv4 and IPv6 addresses specified by an access list and prefix list.
    A Redistribution route map can have multiple entries; routes are evaluated against the entries in sequential order. When a route matches an entry, it is permitted or denied and the route is not evaluated against subsequent entries. If the action of the matching entry is Permit, the firewall also sets the configured attributes from the route map to the redistributed route.
  • Multicast Route Maps
    —Create a multicast route map to filter sources for a dynamic IGMP interface.
The following filters apply to BGP only.
  • AS Path Access Lists
    —Create an AS Path access list:
    • To control importing of BGP routes (into the local BGP RIB) that came from another router, use in a BGP Filtering Profile, in the Inbound Filter List. For example, you want to import only routes that came through specific autonomous systems.
    • To control exporting of BGP routes to another router, use in a BGP Filtering Profile, in the Outbound Filter List.
    • To do anything a BGP route map can do, use in a BGP route map as a match criterion.
    • To redistribute BGP routes, use in a BGP Redistribution route map (AS Path) as a match criterion.
    An AS Path access list can have a maximum of 64 rules and ends with an implicit
    Permit Any
    rule. Use an AS Path access list to deny autonomous systems. Routes are evaluated against the rules in sequential order. When a route matches a rule, the deny or permit action occurs and the route is not evaluated against subsequent rules.
  • Community Lists
    —Create a community list:
    • To reference in a BGP route map to match on BGP community attributes of routes that you want to control in some way. For example, you can set a group of routes (that share a community attribute) to have a specific metric or local preference.
    • To reference in the set actions of a BGP route map to remove communities from routes that meet the match criteria.
    • To match BGP communities in routes that you want to redistribute using a Redistribution route map.
    A community list can have multiple rules; routes are evaluated against the rules in sequential order. When a route matches a rule, the deny or permit action occurs and the route is not evaluated against subsequent rules.
  • BGP Route Maps
    —Create a BGP route map:
    • For the
      Default Originate Route-Map
      field of a BGP AFI Profile; the match criteria define when to generate the default route (0.0.0.0). Apply the BGP AFI profile to a BGP peer group or peer. The Match criteria can be any parameter and if there is a match to an existing BGP route, the default route is created; the Set portion of the route map is not used. Instead, you can use an outbound route-map to set properties for the generated default route.
    • To set (override) BGP attributes that BGP is sending to a peer.
    • For NAT, to set Source Address and IPv4 Next Hop for a certain group of prefixes you are advertising, enter a public IP address from the NAT pool to replace a private IP address.
    • To redistribute static, connected, or OSPF routes into BGP; then reference the BGP route map in a BGP Redistribution profile.
    • In a BGP Filtering Profile, use a BGP route map in
      Inbound Route Map
      or
      Outbound Route Map
      to filter routes that are accepted (learned) from BGP peers into the local BGP RIB (inbound) or advertised to BGP peers (outbound).
    • To conditionally advertise BGP routes, in a BGP Filtering Profile, create an
      Exist Map
      , which specifies that if these conditions in the route exist, advertise the route based on an Advertise Map. Alternatively, specify that if these conditions do not exist, advertise the route based on a
      Non-Exist Advertise Map
      .
    • In a BGP Filtering Profile, set an IPv4 Next Hop to use a public NAT address rather than a private address.
    • In a BGP Filtering Profile, use a BGP route map to unsuppress routes that were suppressed due to route dampening or aggregation.
    • To conditionally filter more specific routes, for a logical router, configure BGP
      Aggregate Routes
      and provide the
      Suppress Map
      .
    • To set attributes for an aggregate route, for a logical router, configure BGP
      Aggregate Routes
      and provide the
      Attribute Map
      .
A filter can have multiple rules; the firewall evaluates packets or routes against the rules in a filter in order by sequence number (
Seq
) of the rule. When a packet or route matches a rule, the deny or permit action occurs and the packet or route is not evaluated against subsequent rules.
All filters except AS Path access lists end with an implicit
Deny Any
rule. All filters except for AS Path access lists must have at least one
Permit
rule; otherwise, all examined routes/packets are denied. AS Path access lists end with an implicit
Permit Any
rule.
Select a configured
Seq
number to open a rule and modify it. Select an
Action
field in a configured rule to modify only the Permit or Deny action.
When adding a rule, leave enough unused sequence numbers between rules to allow future rules to be inserted in the filter. For example, use Seq numbers 10, 20, 30, etc.
  1. Create an access list to permit or deny IPv4 or IPv6 addresses where this filter is applied.
    1. Select
      Network
      Routing
      Filters
      .
    2. Add
      a
      Filters Access List
      by
      Name
      (maximum of 63 characters). The name must start with an alphanumeric character, underscore (_), or hyphen (-), and can contain a combination of alphanumeric characters, underscore, or hyphen. No dot (.) or space is allowed.
    3. Enter a helpful
      Description
      .
    4. Select the
      Type
      of access list:
      IPv4
      or
      IPv6
      .
      1. For IPv4,
        Add
        an
        IPv4 Entry
        and enter the
        Seq
        number for the rule (range is 1 to 65,535).
      2. Select the
        Action
        :
        Deny
        (the default) or
        Permit
        .
      3. For
        Source Address
        , there are three options: select
        Address
        and in the subsequent
        Address
        field, enter an IPv4 address. Enter a
        Wildcard
        mask to indicate a range. A zero (0) in the mask indicates that bit must match the corresponding bit in the address; a one (1) in the mask indicates a “don’t care” bit. The other options are
        Any
        or
        None
        .
      4. For
        Destination Address
        , select
        Address
        and in the subsequent
        Address
        field, enter an IPv4 address. Enter a
        Wildcard
        . A zero (0) in the mask indicates a bit that must match; a one (1) in the mask indicates a “don’t care’ bit. The other options are
        Any
        or
        None
        .
      5. Click
        OK
        to save the entry.
    5. Alternatively, select the
      Type
      to be
      IPv6
      .
      1. For IPv6,
        Add
        an
        IPv6 Entry
        and enter the
        Seq
        number (range is 1 to 65,535).
      2. Select the
        Action
        :
        Deny
        (the default) or
        Permit
        .
      3. For
        Source Address
        , there are three options: select
        Address
        and in the subsequent
        Address
        field, enter an IPv6
        Address
        . Optionally select
        Exact Match of this address
        to have the firewall perform a comparison of both the prefix and prefix length and they must match exactly; otherwise, the firewall determines the match comparison based on whether the route is in the same subnet as the configured prefix. (If the Source Address is
        Any
        or
        None
        , you cannot select
        Exact Match of this address
        .) The other options are
        Any
        or
        None
        .
      4. Click
        OK
        to save the entry. Optionally add more entries.
    6. Click
      OK
      to save the access list.
  2. Create a prefix list.
    1. Select
      Network
      Routing
      Filters
      .
    2. Add
      a
      Filters Prefix List
      by
      Name
      (maximum of 63 characters). The name must start with an alphanumeric character, underscore (_), or hyphen (-), and can contain a combination of alphanumeric characters, underscore, or hyphen. No dot (.) or space is allowed.
    3. Enter a helpful
      Description
      .
    4. Select the
      Type
      of prefix for this rule to filter:
      IPv4
      or
      IPv6
      .
      1. For IPv4,
        Add
        an
        IPv4 Entry
        , and enter the
        Seq
        number for the rule; range is 1 to 65,535.
      2. Select the
        Action
        :
        Deny
        (the default) or
        Permit
        .
      3. For
        Prefix
        , there are three options; default is
        None
        . Another option is to select
        Network any
        . The third option is to select
        Entry
        and enter an IPv4
        Network
        prefix with slash and a base prefix length that together specify a network, for example, 192.168.2.0/24. Optionally specify that the prefix length be
        Greater Than Or Equal
        to a number (that is at least as large as the base length you specified; range is 0 to 32). Optionally specify a top limit to the range by specifying
        Less Than Or Equal
        to a number (that is at least as high as the base length and at least as high as the
        Greater Than Or Equal
        length if configured; range is 0 to 32).
      Comparing a route to the prefix rule (IPv4 or IPv6) is a two-step process: 1) Match the prefix with the network first. 2) Match the prefix length to the mask range (Greater Than or Equal to Less Than Or Equal). For example, consider the preflix list rule with Network 192.168.3.0/24, and a prefix length Greater Than or Equal to 26 and Less Than or Equal to 30. The following table shows routes that are tested and whether they pass or fail the rule. Routes that pass the rule are subject to the configured action (Deny or Permit).
      Sample Route
      Result
      192.168.3.0/28
      Pass: the network and prefix length match the rule.
      192.168.2.0/30
      Fail: network does not match the rule.
      192.168.3.0/32
      Fail: prefix length does not match the rule.
      In the output summary of the rule, LOU is Logical Operator Unit (equal, greater or equal, less or equal). >= indicates a prefix length greater than or equal to the value; it is the lowest value of a range of the prefix length. <= indicates a prefix length less than or equal to the value; it is the highest value of a range of the prefix length.
    5. Alternatively,
      Add
      an
      IPv6 Entry
      and follow the steps similar to those for an IPv4 prefix rule. The range of the IPv6 prefix length is
      Greater Than or Equal
      to 0 to 128 and
      Less Than Or Equal
      to 0 to 128.
      For example, consider the prefix list rule with Network 2001:db8:1/48, and a prefix length Greater Than or Equal to 56 and Less Than or Equal to 64. The following table shows routes that are tested and whether they pass or fail the rule. Routes that pass the rule are subject to the configured action (Deny or Permit).
      Sample Route
      Result
      2001:db8:1/64
      Pass: the network and prefix length match the rule.
      2001:db8:2/48
      Fail: network does not match the rule.
      2001:db8:1/65
      Fail: prefix length does not match the rule.
    6. Click
      OK
      to save the prefix entry. Optionally add more entries.
    7. Click
      OK
      to save the Prefix List.
  3. Create an AS Path Access List for BGP.
    1. Select
      Network
      Routing
      Filters
      .
    2. Add
      an
      AS Path Acess List
      by
      Name
      (maximum of 63 characters). The name must start with an alphanumeric character, underscore (_), or hyphen (-), and can contain a combination of alphanumeric characters, underscore, or hyphen. No dot (.) or space is allowed.
    3. Enter a helpful
      Description
      .
    4. Add
      an
      Entry
      and enter a
      Seq
      number; range is 1 to 65,535.
    5. Select the
      Action
      :
      Deny
      (the default) or
      Permit
      .
      Each AS Path access list ends with an implicit
      Permit Any
      rule. Use an AS Path access list to deny autonomous systems.
    6. Enter the
      Aspath Regex
      (regular expression) in the format
      regex1:regex2:regex3
      , where a colon (:) separates three AS values. Characters allowed are 1234567890_^|[,{}()]$*+.?-\. For example, .*65000 in a Deny statement excludes prefixes originating from AS 65000.
    7. Click
      OK
      to save the entry. Optionally add more entries; a maximum of 64 entries are allowed in an AS Path access list.
    8. Click
      OK
      to save the AS Path access list.
  4. Create a Community List.
    1. Select
      Network
      Routing
      Filters
      .
    2. Add
      a
      Filters Community List
      by
      Name
      (maximum of 63 characters). The name must start with an alphanumeric character, underscore (_), or hyphen (-), and can contain a combination of alphanumeric characters, underscore, or hyphen. No dot (.) or space is allowed.
    3. Enter a helpful
      Description
      .
    4. Select the
      Type
      :
      • Regular
        Add
        a
        Seq
        number (range is 1 to 65,535), select the
        Action
        :
        Deny
        (the default) or
        Permit
        , and
        Add
        one or more community values, select one or more well-known communities, or enter a combination of community values and well-known communities. Separate multiple communities with a vertical bar (|), for example,
        6409:10|6520:13|internet
        . Enter a maximum of 16 communities in a
        Regular
        entry (rule).
        • A regular community value in the format AA:NN where AA is an AS number and NN is a network number (each with a range of 0 to 65,535).
        • accept-own
          —Represents well-known community value ACCEPT-OWN (0xFFFF0001)
        • blackhole
          —Represents well-known community value BLACKHOLE (0xFFFF029A). The neighboring network should discard traffic destined for the prefix.
        • graceful-shutdown
          —Represents well-known community value GRACEFUL_SHUTDOWN (0xFFFF0000)
        • internet
          —Represents well-known community value 0 (0x00). Advertise a prefix to all BGP neighbors.
        • local-as
          —Represents well-known community value NO_EXPORT_SUBCONFED (0xFFFFFF03). The effect is to not advertise the prefix outside of the sub-AS in a confederation.
        • no-advertise
          —Represents well-known community value NO_ADVERTISE (0xFFFFFF02). Adding this community to a prefix means the receiving BGP peer will place the prefix in its BGP route table, but won’t advertise the prefix to other neighbors.
        • no-export
          —Represents well-known community value NO_EXPORT (0xFFFFFF01).Adding this community to a prefix means the receiving BGP peer will advertise the prefix only to iBGP neighbors, not neighbors outside the AS.
        • no-peer
          —Represents well-known community value NOPEER (0xFFFFFF04).
        • route-filter-v4
          —Represents well-known community value ROUTE_FILTER_v4 (0xFFFF0003).
        • route-filter-v6
          —Represents well-known community value ROUTE_FILTER_v6 (0xFFFF0005).
      • Large
        Add
        a
        Seq
        number (range is 1 to 65,535), select the
        Action
        :
        Deny
        (the default) or
        Permit
        , and
        Add
        a large community regular expression (LC REGEX) entry. Characters allowed in an entry are 1234567890_^|[,{}()]$*+.?-\. Each community must be in the format
        regex1:regex2:regex3
        ; for example,
        203[1-2]:205[2-5]:206[5-6]
        . Enter a maximum of eight communities in a
        Large
        entry (rule).
      • Extended
        Add
        a
        Seq
        number (range is 1 to 65,535), select the
        Action
        :
        Deny
        (the default) or
        Permit
        , and
        Add
        the BGP extended community regular expression (EC REGEX). Characters allowed are 1234567890_^|[,{}()]$*+.?-\. Each extended community must be in the format
        regex1:regex2
        ; for example,
        204*[3-8]:205*[4-8]
        . Enter a maximum of eight communities in an
        Extended
        entry (rule).
    5. Click
      OK
      to save the entry in the Community List. Optionally add more entries of the same type (Regular, Large, or Extended).
    6. Click
      OK
      to save the Community List.
  5. Create a BGP route map.
    1. Select
      Network
      Routing
      Filters
      .
    2. Add
      a
      Filters Route Maps BGP
      by
      Name
      (maximum of 63 characters). The name must start with an alphanumeric character, underscore (_), or hyphen (-), and can contain a combination of alphanumeric characters, underscore, or hyphen. No dot (.) or space is allowed.
    3. Enter a helpful
      Description
      of the route map.
    4. Add
      a route map and on the
      Entry
      tab, assign a
      Seq
      number; range is 1 to 65,535.
      Assign sequence numbers that are five or more numbers apart so you have unused numbers for which to insert additional entries in the future.
    5. Enter a helpful
      Description
      of the entry (rule).
    6. For
      Action
      , select
      Deny
      or
      Permit
      .
    7. On the
      Match
      tab, specify the criteria that determine which routes are subject to the function that uses this route map. Multiple attributes are logically ANDed, meaning all criteria must be met.
      • AS Path Access List
        —Select an AS path list. Default is
        None
        .
      • Regular Community
        —Select a Community list. Default is
        None
        .
      • Large Community
        —Select a Large Community list. Default is
        None
        .
      • Extended Community
        —Select an Extended Community list. Default is
        None
        .
      • Metric
        —Enter a value in the range 0 to 4,294,967,295.
      • Interface
        —Select a local interface from the list of all interfaces for all logical routers. Make sure to choose an interface that belongs to the logical router you are configuring. Default is
        None
        . At commit, the firewall checks that the interface you chose belongs to the logical router you are configuring.
      • Origin
        —Select the origin of the route:
        ebgp
        ,
        ibgp
        , or
        incomplete
        . Default is
        none
        .
      • Tag
        —Enter a tag value that has meaning in your networks, in the range 0 to 4,294,967,295.
      • Local Preference
        —Enter a value in the range 0 to 4,294,967,295.
      • Peer
        —Select a peer name or
        local (Static or Redistributed routes)
        . Default is
        none
        .
    8. Select
      IPv4
      or
      IPv6
      to match on various types of addresses. If you select
      IPv4
      :
      • On the
        Address
        tab, select an
        Access List
        to specify addresses to match.
      • Select a
        Prefix List
        to specify addresses to match. It matches the prefix received from a peer or a prefix redistributed to protocol from another protocol.
        If both an access list and prefix list are specified, both requirements must be met (logical AND).
      • On the
        Next Hop
        tab, select an
        Access List
        to specify next hop addresses to match.
      • Select a
        Prefix List
        to specify next hop addresses to match.
      • On the
        Route Source
        tab, select an
        Access List
        to specify a source IP address of a route to match. For example, the access list could permit a distant peer with the address 192.168.2.2 who is advertising a route to a certain prefix. You can make this BGP route map match on the route’s source address 192.168.2.2 and then perhaps filter the route based on matching the peer address 192.168.2.2 as the source of the route, or set a next hop for routes matching that route source.
      • Specify a
        Prefix List
        to specify one or more source network prefixes to match.
    9. If you select
      IPv6
      :
      • On the
        Address
        tab, select an
        Access List
        to specify addresses to match.
      • Select a
        Prefix List
        to specify addresses to match.
      • On the
        Next Hop
        tab, select an
        Access List
        to specify next hop addresses to match.
    10. Set
      any of the following attributes for routes that meet the match criteria:
      • Enable BGP atomic aggregate
        —Mark the route as a less specific route because it has been aggregated. ATOMIC_AGGREGATE is a well-known discretionary attribute that alerts BGP speakers along a path that information has been lost due to route aggregation, and therefore the aggregate path might not be the best path to the destination. When some router are aggregated by an aggregator, the aggregator attaches its Router-ID to the aggregated route into the AGGREGATOR-ID attribute and it sets the ATOMIC_AGGREGATE attribute or not, based on whether the AS_PATH information from the aggregated routers was preserved.
      • Aggregator AS
        —Enter the Aggregator AS. The Aggregator attribute includes the AS number and the IP address of the router that originated the aggregated route.The IP address is the Router ID of the router that performs the route aggregation.
      • Router ID
        —Enter the aggregator’s Router ID (usually a loopback address).
      • Local Preference
        —Enter the local preference to which matching routes are set; range is 0 to 4,294,967,295. IBGP Update packets carry local preference, which is advertised to IBGP peers only. When there are multiple routes to another AS, the firewall prefers the highest local preference.
      • Tag
        —Set a tag; range is 1 to 4,294,967,295.
      • Metric Action
        —Select an action:
        set
        ,
        add
        , or
        subtract
        . You can set the specified Metric Value, or add the specified Metric Value to the matching route’s original metric value, or subtract the specified Metric Value from the matching route’s original metric value; default is set. Select the add or subtract action to adjust a metric and thus prioritize or deprioritize the matching route.
      • Metric Value
        —Enter the metric value to set matching routes to, or add to, or subtract from the original metric value; range is 0 to 4,294,967,295.
      • Weight
        —Set a weight (applied locally; not propagated); range is 0 to 4,294,967,295.
      • Origin
        —Set the origin of the matching routes:
        ebgp
        ,
        ibgp
        , or
        incomplete
        (unclear how the route came to be added to the RIB).
      • Originator ID
        —Set the IP address of the originator of the matching routes.
      • Delete Regular Community
        —Select a regular community to delete. Default is
        None
        .
      • Delete Large Community
        —Select a large community to delete. Default is
        None
        .
      • Select
        IPv4
        or
        IPv6
        as the AFI.
      • On the
        IPv4
        tab, select a
        Source Address
        to set from the list of all source addresses from all logical routers or select
        None
        . At commit, the firewall checks that the source address you chose belongs to the logical router you are configuring.
      • Select an
        IPv4 Next-Hop
        to set:
        none
        ,
        peer-address (Use Peer Address)
        , or
        unchanged
        .
      • On the
        IPv6
        tab, select
        IPv6 Nexthop Prefer Global Address
        to prefer the global unicast address over the other IPv6 address types (link-local address, anycast address, or multicast address) for next hop. (By default, connected peers prefer a link-local next hop address over a global next hop address.)
      • On the
        IPv6
        tab, select a
        Source Address
        to set from the list of all source addresses from all logical routers or select
        None
        . At commit, the firewall checks that the source address you chose belongs to the logical router you are configuring.
      • Select an
        IPv6 Next-Hop
        to set:
        none
        or
        peer-address (Use Peer Address)
        .
      • In the AS Path window,
        Add
        up to four AS paths to
        Exclude
        from the AS path of matching routes, perhaps to remove an AS from a confederation.
      • Add
        up to four AS Paths to
        Prepend
        to the AS Path of matching route(s) (to make the route in an advertisement less desirable).
      • In the Regular Community window, select
        Overwrite Regular Community
        to overwrite the regular community.
      • Add
        a
        Regular Community
        to add one or more regular communities.
      • In the Large Community window, select
        Overwrite Large Community
        to overwrite the large community.
      • Add
        a
        Large Community
        to add one or more large communities.
      • In the Regular Community window, select
        Overwrite Regular Community
        to overwrite the regular community.
      • Add
        a
        Regular Community
        to add one or more regular communities.
      • In the Large Community window, select
        Overwrite Large Community
        to overwrite the large community.
      • Add
        a
        Large Community
        to add one or more large communities.
    11. Click
      OK
      to save the route map entry. Optionally add more entries.
    12. Click
      OK
      to save the BGP route map.
  6. Create a Redistribution Route Map.
    1. Select
      Network
      Routing
      Filters
      .
    2. Add
      a
      Filters Route Maps Redistribution
      by
      Name
      (maximum of 63 characters). The name must start with an alphanumeric character, underscore (_), or hyphen (-), and can contain a combination of alphanumeric characters, underscore, or hyphen. No dot (.) or space is allowed.
    3. Enter a helpful
      Description
      .
    4. To redistribute from a
      Source Protocol
      , select
      BGP
      ,
      OSPF
      ,
      OSPFv3
      ,
      RIP
      , or
      Connected Static
      . The source protocol is where the Match selections apply.
    5. To redistribute the routes to a
      Destination Protocol
      or local RIB, select
      BGP
      ,
      OSPF
      ,
      OSPFv3
      ,
      RIP
      , or
      Rib
      . The destination protocol is where the Set selections apply. The Destination Protocols available in the dropdown depend on the Source Protocol selected. (This step shows an example of BGP redistributed to OSPF.)
    6. Add
      an
      Entry
      and enter the
      Seq
      number (range is 1 to 65,535).
    7. Enter a helpful
      Description
      .
    8. Select the
      Action
      :
      Deny
      or
      Permit
      .
    9. Select the
      Match
      tab to configure criteria for the source protocol; this example specifies BGP attributes to match.
    10. Select an
      AS Path Access List
      ; default is
      None
      .
    11. Select a
      Regular Community
      ; default is
      None
      .
    12. Select a
      Large Community
      ; default is
      None
      .
    13. Select an
      Extended Community
      ; default is
      None
      .
    14. Enter a
      Metric
      ; range is 0 to 4,294,967,295.
    15. Select an
      Interface
      ; default is
      None
      .
    16. Select the
      Origin
      of the route:
      ebgp
      ,
      ibgp
      , or
      incomplete
      ; default is
      none
      .
    17. Enter a
      Tag
      ; range is 1 to 4,294,967,295.
    18. Enter a
      Local Preference
      ; range is 0 to 4,294,967,295.
    19. Select a
      Peer
      name or
      local (Static or Redistributed routes)
      ; default is
      none
      .
    20. The
      Address
      tab refers to the Destination address in a route. Select an
      Access List
      to specify routes with a destination address that must match in order to be redistributed. Default is
      None
      .
    21. Select a
      Prefix List
      to sp